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Interpretation Booths

Shopping for Interpretation Booths, SI Equipment, Translation Radios, Microphones Systems?

When it comes to international events where your audience speaks different languages, Spanish Solutions as the leader in the industry, can walk you trough the entire process. Whether you need to set up a single room or multiple rooms, we got your back! Here are some tips:

First, it is important to determine if your event will be indoors or outdoors since there is equipment for this two main categories:

For indoors interpreting it is customary to use STATIONARY equipment since it is cabled, and like with all cabled equipment, the transmission is guaranteed to be flawless and free of interference from nearby TV/radio stations, taxi services, and so forth.

However, if the need for interpretation is outdoors, like at a site visit, a city tour, and other settings of that nature, you can resort to PORTABLE equipment design to provide interpreters the mobility they need in these type of contexts.

Second, once you know where the event will be held, you are ready to determine the number of languages for which you will need interpretation.

A two-language combination (English and 1 foreign language, for example Spanish) is considered a simple setting and should include at a minimum :
* 1 table-top interpretation booth to reduce the noise generated by the voices of the interpreters and so prevent inconveniencing the English-speaking audience;
* 1 stationary transmitter to broadcast the interpretation to the audience, both the English speakers and the foreign language speakers;
* 1 Interpreters control unit (at a minimum, some brands require 2 ICUs, one per each interpreter), so that the interpreters can mute their microphones to cough, or regulate the volume of the sound they are getting into their headsets, and set the volume of their voices being broadcast to the audience.
* 2 interpreters' headsets with microphones so the interpreters can receive sound and broadcast through the stationary transmitter.
* the number of translation radios or receivers for the speakers of the foreign language in need of interpretation. Notice though, that if your event includes a presentation of speech by a foreign delegate in a language other than English, you will need receivers for the entire audience.

A three-language combination (English + 2 foreign, for example Spanish and Portuguese) is, however, a more complex set-up that will need double the amount of equipment:
* 2 table-top interpretation booths to reduce the noise generated by the voices of the interpreters and so prevent inconveniencing the English-speaking audience;
* 2 stationary transmitters to broadcast the interpretation to the audience, both the English speakers and the foreign language speakers;
* 2 Interpreters control units, so that the interpreters can mute their microphones to cough, or regulate the volume of the sound they are getting into their headsets, and set the volume of their voices being broadcast to the audience.
* 4 interpreters' headsets with microphones so the interpreters can receive sound and broadcast through the stationary transmitter.
* the number of translation radios or receivers for the speakers of the foreign languages (Spanish and Portuguese) in need of interpretation. Notice though, that if your event includes a presentation of speech by a foreign delegate in a language other than English, you will need receivers for the entire audience (English, Spanish and Portuguese audiences).

Third, and this is where it gets really interesting, let's add one more layer of complexity and include not only a main conference room in 3 languages but also breakout sessions with 2 languages each to conduct workshops for your two audiences, Spanish and English speakers in one, and Portuguese and English speakers in the other. In this case you will need several set-ups to cover each and every room. So for illustration sake, say that you have:
1 Main Conference Room
2 Breakout sessions
1 Work Lunch
1 Ice-breaker in the evening

Your need has increased and so has the simultaneous interpretation equipment, also known as "Translation Equipment" necessary to guarantee a smooth flow of communication in all three languages and in all your rooms. Your order should most likely be as follows:

Main Conference Room:
* 2 fully-enclosed interpretation booths to reduce the noise generated by the voices of the interpreters and so prevent inconveniencing the English-speaking audience;
* 3 stationary transmitters to broadcast the interpretation to the audience, in English, Spanish and Portuguese, to follow our example;
* 1 slitter-mixer to combine all three transmitters and provide RELAY between the interpretation booths so that presenters can speak in their own languages and both, Spanish and Portuguese interpreters can resort to the interpretation of their colleagues to then go into English, a simple SI equipment configuration that allows interpreters to get the sound not only from the floor but also from the booth next to them and so they can guarantee interpretation from any of the source languages into their language and vice versa.
* 2 Interpreters control units, so that the interpreters can mute their microphones to cough, or regulate the volume of the sound they are getting into their headsets, and set the volume of their voices being broadcast to the audience.
* 4 interpreters' headsets with microphones so the interpreters can receive sound and broadcast through the stationary transmitter.
* the number of translation radios or receivers for the speakers of the foreign languages (Spanish and Portuguese) in need of interpretation. Notice though, that if your event includes a presentation of speech by a foreign delegate in a language other than English, you will need receivers for the entire audience (English, Spanish and Portuguese audiences).

Portuguese Breakout session:
1 TT interpretation booth, same as 2 language set-up.

Spanish Breakout Session:
Same as Portuguese breakout session.

Work Lunch:
1 TT interpretation booth, same as 2 language set-up.

Icebreaker Event in the evening:
* 1 Portable transmitter
* 2 interpreters microphones with headbands
* the number of translation radios or receivers for the speakers of the foreign language in need of interpretation. Notice though, that if your event includes a presentation of speech by a foreign delegate in a language other than English, you will need receivers for the entire audience.

Fourth, setting up all that equipment may take anywhere from 4 to 8 hours so it is important to plan accordingly and have both AV company and Interpretation company get together the day prior to the event, set up all equipment and run a sound test. A sound test will guarantee that the volume of all pieces of equipment are leveled, statics can be worked on, and all cabling is properly connected. Additionally, all interpretation booths need to be careful assembled to prevent them from collapsing in the middle of the event putting both, interpreters and participants at risk.

Fifth, if your audience includes delegates from different nations and they all need to have a voice during the conference, you may want to consider a microphone system such as PPT microphones, also known as push-to-talk microphones or delegate microphones. With this microphones system each delegate will have an opportunity to push on a button and be able to address the entire audience. All microphones are connected to a mixing board also known as mixer which, in turn, is connected to the interpreter control unit (ICU) and therefore they can receive the sound feed from all microphones in the room.

Sixth, other microphones you will need are:
1 wireless lapel microphone for your speaker
1 or more wireless handheld microphones for Q&As so all participants can ask questions to the VIP guests, main panel, or to the speakers.

Finally, remember to request the right number of interpreters following industry standards:
* interpreters work in pairs and take turns every 25 to 30 minutes to prevent mental exhaustion.
* interpreters need to set up their computers inside the booth to watch the presentations, check vocabulary and create glossaries, so they will, at a minimum, 1 table and 2 chairs at a minimum, and sufficient time to get situated.
* interpreters need an audio feed into their headsets.
* interpreters need to know the channel number for each language.
* interpreters need the support of a technician or technical assistant.

Last but not least, if your audience includes foreign delegations you may want to consider hiring an "administrative interpreter" to handle the agenda in foreign languages, help your participants deal with common situations like lost luggage, international calls home, front desk issues, channel set up on their receivers, among other.

Whatever your layout or language combination, just give us a call, we specialize in international conferences and it will be our pleasure to help you. Call now 3058914141, one of our technicians will work with you until your are fully satisfied!

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